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Art Studio Section

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Melody Goebel

Re: Art Studio Section

Postby Melody Goebel » Thu Mar 29, 2012 6:27 pm

For help with poor perspective:
To judge your mistakes better, use a flat mirror and look at your creation in it. This gives the illusion that it was done by someone else (you are now seeing it as everyone else is), so you can criticize better (for it is much harder to criticize yourself). You will be surprised, I know I was when I used this trick from Leonardo Da Vinci's notebooks. This is one of the best ways of seeing your flaws in your own art work. The other Da Vinci mentions is: Use a peace of glass or anything that can be used to trace on.Trace a very basic outline ( just enough to mark were everything is) and trace this onto your paper or surface that your using (The other method Da Vinci invented was the drawing grid, this was used for large scale painting such as The Last Supper.). This is the most useful advice I've ever been able to find on the perspective.
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Carson Collins
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Re: Art Studio Section

Postby Carson Collins » Fri Mar 30, 2012 3:49 pm

...use a flat mirror and look at your creation in it.
- Leonardo da Vinci

I agree, this is an excellent "trick" for evaluating composition. Another one that I learned from my late friend and mentor Joe Glasco is to look at the canvas upside-down and on its side. A really good composition will look balanced no matter which way you turn it. :idea:
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John Marsdon Watkins
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Re: Art Studio Section

Postby John Marsdon Watkins » Wed Jul 18, 2012 5:12 am

Why buy art canvases when you can make your own ? I stretch my own canvas and make my own stretchers. First, i buy the canvas by the roll , i go to home depot and by the stretcher wood (1x2 x 8 @ 0.95 ea. ) Take the wood and cut sq, 2 pcs 16" and 2 pcs 20" , then cut ea. corner on a 45 degree angle.Drill a 1/8 hole in 4 corners , wood glue the corners and fasten together with the screws. Do this on a flat surface to keep the frame flat. Stretch the canvas over the frame and attach with a staple gun using 3/8" staples.Final results 157/8 x 197/8 for a 16 x 20 canvas. Note: Michales craft stores sell the canvas, you can get a 50% off coupon on line.If your canvas is not tight, wet the back with water, set in the sun to dry and it will tighten.My cost for a 16 x 20 is abt $3.00
SRobertson

Re: Art Studio Section

Postby SRobertson » Wed Jul 18, 2012 9:29 am

Adding to John's suggestion...it also allows the freedom to create any size or depth canvas you desire.
I will add that a great storage container for short brushes is a plastic spaghetti storage tube from the dollar discount store. You can store them upright which will make them last longer.
Another idea is using an ashtray for fresh water for brush wetting and the sectioned cigarette holder is perfect as a rest for keeping the brushes in use handy. Just be sure it is clean!
Lorena Shiffer
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Re: Art Studio Section

Postby Lorena Shiffer » Wed Jul 18, 2012 1:57 pm

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Last edited by Lorena Shiffer on Wed Jul 25, 2012 6:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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John Marsdon Watkins
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Re: Art Studio Section

Postby John Marsdon Watkins » Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:24 pm

Very good point and thanks Lorena for the quality instructions. I have another suggestion that works if you do not have a projector.Take a photo, load it to your computer file. Bring it up on your computer full screen. Take a sheet of note book paper or serval sheets taped together and using masking tap only,fasten this to your computer screen, temp. of course, now you can trace the picture on the paper. After you are complete copy serval copies saving the original. next , using scissors cut out the images and position on the painting, trace with a pencil, then do your painting.Try this it will also help you to find prespective ,good exercise.
Lorena Shiffer
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Re: Art Studio Section

Postby Lorena Shiffer » Wed Jul 18, 2012 9:50 pm

I just found this online: http://www.camera-obscura-lucida-shop.com/
Utilize the secrets of the Old Masters to reflect an image of your subject right over your paper or canvas!
When you look through view hole you'll see a transparent "ghost" image of the landscape, object or person you are drawing and you simply draw right over that image. The result is a perfectly proportioned sketch with correct perspective-captured with your own hand quickly and easily.
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John Marsdon Watkins
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Re: Art Studio Section

Postby John Marsdon Watkins » Mon Mar 18, 2013 3:57 pm

If you go to my web page you will see that i not only paint but i custom make model boats.I need your help please. When it comes to putting the names on the boats, it is not only time consuming but very delicate work hand lettering in such small detail.I wold like to make decals that i can apply .Of course the letters would vary in size from 1/4 " to 1/2 " and should apply with a professional result.Any help or suggestions will be appreciated. :D :D
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John Marsdon Watkins
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Re:

Postby John Marsdon Watkins » Mon Mar 18, 2013 4:22 pm

Carson Collins wrote:Yo, Wolfie, go peddle your paranoia somewhere else why don't you?
YES< YES ,LIKE,LIKE
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John Marsdon Watkins
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Re: Art Studio Section

Postby John Marsdon Watkins » Mon Mar 18, 2013 4:37 pm

Carson Collins wrote:Another good trick is to use "block filler" as opposed to gesso. This is a trowel-grade acrylic product that is only slightly off-white and is mixed with Bentonite clay. It's used in Commercial Painting to prime concrete block walls, and it's sold in all commercial paint stores. It's a whale of a lot less expensive than gesso from the Art Supply store.

It's sandable (insofar as any acrylic paint product is sandable) - try using an electric-powered buzz-block and watch the acrylic turn into something resembling chewing-gum from the heat - and if you're doing large scale paintings it can save you a considerable amount of money. :idea:
Good point Carson,experience is the greatest teacher of all.I use acrylic house paint that is very thick to prime my canvases,using a 3 inch good quality brush,use a spray bottle to wet and brush out all lines lightly as it drys.Works great.been doing it for 20 + years. :D

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