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Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:56 pm
by Huggertwo1
Image

Re: Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 9:45 am
by Robert Bewick
good focus and light. work on framing the subject (which is adorable btw :lol: )

Re: Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 11:21 am
by Huggertwo1
Finally a reply. Does framing the subject mean making sure the subject is centered both top to bottom and side to side?

Re: Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:05 pm
by Lorena Shiffer
Framing means having an object in the foreground to give depth and interest within a photograph. For ex: taking a sunset shot just ground and sky is a little boring no matter how increadible the sky may be. Framing would be having some tree branches "framing" the vista on the edge or edges. In Photographic compostion one should not center the horizon line nor the focal point. Rule of thirds means you draw a nine point grid, like a tic tac toe box

Rule of thirds - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

How to use the rule of thirds in Digital Photography; Rule Of Thirds "how to" How to use the rule of thirds; A simple explanation of Rule Of Thirds
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thirds (GO HERE TO SEE A VISUAL EX)

The rule of thirds is a "rule of thumb" or guideline which applies to the process of composing visual images such as paintings, photographs and designs.[1] The guideline proposes that an image should be imagined as divided into nine equal parts by two equally-spaced horizontal lines and two equally-spaced vertical lines, and that important compositional elements should be placed along these lines or their intersections.[2] Proponents of the technique claim that aligning a subject with these points creates more tension, energy and interest in the composition than simply centering the subject would.[citation needed]

The photograph to the right demonstrates the application of the rule of thirds. The horizon sits at the horizontal line dividing the lower third of the photo from the upper two-thirds. The tree sits at the intersection of two lines, sometimes called a power point or a crash point[citation needed]. Points of interest in the photo don't have to actually touch one of these lines to take advantage of the rule of thirds.[citation needed] For example, the brightest part of the sky near the horizon where the sun recently set does not fall directly on one of the lines, but does fall near the intersection of two of the lines, close enough to take advantage of the rule.

Re: Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 2:12 pm
by Lorena Shiffer
10 Top Photography Composition Rules
There are no fixed rules in photography, but there are guidelines which can often help you to enhance the impact of your photos.

http://www.photographymad.com/pages/vie ... tion-rules

Re: Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 12:31 pm
by Huggertwo1
Oh..ok...cool. So if I want to crop an image using photo shop or whatever do they have grids you can use?

Re: Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:33 pm
by Lorena Shiffer
Rule of thirds is a shooting technique, the edges of the camera image are the first steps of cropping. Photoshop is for editing the image. You can crop to create the sense that the focal point is on the inter-sections of the nine point grid if your original cropping within the camera frame was off. Ideally when shooting the image initially you have cropped out any thing that is not important to the image. You have placed the focal point at one of the grid intersections. Please read the actual links I sent you (look at the photo examples they provide) they apply to the taking of the image. Photoshop is either just cleaning up distractive elements in the photo or altering the photo to different color choices or morphing the photo into something that was not the actual shot.
The grid is an imaginary device, it helps you to organize the placement of elements within the image, when you are capturing the image; its not really a device in photoshop

Re: Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:12 am
by MiChelleAngella
Since you got some good advice, I won't repeat, but will add to that..
I think if you just crop the sailer out, it would make a nice composition with just your daughter.. [the reflection in her shades, plus her cuteness will make it interesting enough].

Re: Trying Photography "Howdy Sailor" (comments?)

Posted: Sun Apr 29, 2012 10:51 pm
by printbucket
I agree with maybe framing it a bit. Another bit of advice would be to get down more. I found that the most dynamic shots with children are when done at that child’s level, if not a tad bit lower. So try kneeling, squatting, sitting in a chair, sitting on the ground, heck when I photograph babies I get right down and lay on the ground with them. But do whatever you can to get eye level with them I would avoid bending over however as it just doesn’t seem to make as big of an impact.