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30day artist, please feel to go wild of critizing!

Post your art here! Discussion and critiques of user-submitted artwork.
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chinyew
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30day artist, please feel to go wild of critizing!

Postby chinyew » Sat Aug 05, 2006 1:39 am

hi, everyone.

this is the blog i created:

the escapade of living and becoming an artist
in 30 days with a quota of 40 works. Every month
a new artist take the challege. Updated daily!
1 Year anniversary. 8 international artist.

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http://www.30dayartist.com

feel free to comment on works and concept.

thank you so much.

i'm sorry if this is consider spamming, cause
i dunno where else the best place to ask for
comments.

and as all artist know, comments is really useful.

cheers.

-chinyew
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Carson Collins
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Postby Carson Collins » Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:32 am

Your concept seems to have been lifted from the TV show "30 Days", which was a spinoff from the movie "Supersize Me"... I'm not at all sure this paradigm is a good fit
for the process of being/becoming an artist.

Being an artist (a real one) requires a sort of monomania - or obsessive-compulsive disorder, if you prefer - that one either has, or does not have. I don't think it can be
bought, taught, or otherwise acquired - and certainly not in 30 days.

Some would call being an artist a "gift" but the flip side of that coin is that you can't get rid of it, either. It's a compulsion; a "calling" if you prefer more flowery language.

The vast majority of us spend our lives making stuff that no one wants and waiting for something that's never going to happen... Most artists (I'm not talking about
hobbyists or other dilettantes) lead rather sordid lives, and by any rational/material standards would be better off without it.

The problems a real artist faces would seem to be the same in any country: poverty, and the fact that very few people are ever going to understand or appreciate what you
do. It doesn't seem to me that your "30 Day Artist" project deals with any real issues.

"JMO!"
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chinyew
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Postby chinyew » Sat Aug 05, 2006 12:04 pm

thanks for the comment.

but give me a chance at the site.

last year, i did it. and it changed my life.
it made me braver to go out and seek my dreams.

and since 8 artist from different region have joined me for the 30 day escapade. and they learn many out of it.

30day artist is an experience.
it change lives. i receive one email during my
last run of a girl, of how she remembered bout
my paintings when she broke up with her ex.

and my paintings back then was strongly reflect
on my passin on of a breakup.

but this year, i've learned more.
its about the black and white force.
syncrodestiny.

and yes, ironically when you mentioned it,
i do have a poverty-theme painting comin.

not because you mentioned it, but because
i've planned it earlier.

so, please do give http://www.30dayartist.com a chance.

i met a veteran in a forum once. he was a skeptic.
i challenge him into takin over. and he did.
he repainted 40 over his old paintings.
and now, his havin a solo show.

cheers.

-chinyew
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Carson Collins
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Postby Carson Collins » Sat Aug 05, 2006 1:38 pm

last year, i did it. and it changed my life.
it made me braver to go out and seek my dreams.


I'm happy for you (and welcome to FM, by the way).
However, it strikes me that art and art therapy are two quite different things.
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mtv65
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From a non-artist, hobbyist, dilettante or whatever

Postby mtv65 » Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:04 pm

you'd like to call me, Hamlet. And comfortable with it.

Looks like we're back to the basic question again: What is art? What is an artist.

By your definition there are not many "real artists" here.

I do not however buy completely the "starving artist" thing. I do belive though that it has something to do with having a gift (or the opposite if you like). Maybe something to do with how one sees the world and a need to comment on it. But then again what differs a flower painting by Monet from another painter's (hobbyist) flowers? Both might feel passionately about water lillies. . . The hobbyist might be a person with less formal skills due to a hard life with lots of obligations and no time for being obsessive.

I agree that you can not be taught to be an artist in 30 days BUT classes and 30 days to explore might bring OUT whatever artistic talent there is.

And let's face it most famous artists have spent years in art colleges or years studying and copying other artists to learn the skills, so you need a bit of skills together with the "gift".

The vast majority of us spend our lives making stuff that no one wants and waiting for something that's never going to happen


The problems a real artist faces would seem to be the same in any country: poverty, and the fact that very few people are ever going to understand or appreciate what you do.


So by saying that you sort of says that to be a real artist you have to produce stuff that almost no one can relate to . . . By that definition my countryman Munch was not a real artist because almost everyone can relate and understand his paintings . . . . .

I do believe having had some personal experience with hard times often makes the artist make the paiting, the book or whatever art work more interesting, but living like a starving bohemian artist, obsessed with himself and his art does not neccessary lead to good art.

As I started by saying, I DO NOT consider or call myself an artist and probably never will BUT I hope that I might develope a bit more artistic skills as time goes by. Hopefully LOL. At least the world looks very different to me after I began painting.

All in all I do feel that your definitions are a bit too narrow. As a language teacher I have seen talent suddenly burst out with a little support and coaching. I therefore believe that there might be many a hidden artist among the hobbyists. And some kind of 30 days focus (not neccessary this kind) might help the person break loose from the hobbyist's boundries.

Trine
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Life begins at 40, Right? At least my life as an artist did.
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Rez
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Postby Rez » Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:42 pm

hamlet279 wrote:Your concept seems to have been lifted from the TV show "30 Days", which was a spinoff from the movie "Supersize Me"... I'm not at all sure this paradigm is a good fit
for the process of being/becoming an artist.

Being an artist (a real one) requires a sort of monomania - or obsessive-compulsive disorder, if you prefer - that one either has, or does not have. I don't think it can be
bought, taught, or otherwise acquired - and certainly not in 30 days.

Some would call being an artist a "gift" but the flip side of that coin is that you can't get rid of it, either. It's a compulsion; a "calling" if you prefer more flowery language.

The vast majority of us spend our lives making stuff that no one wants and waiting for something that's never going to happen... Most artists (I'm not talking about
hobbyists or other dilettantes) lead rather sordid lives, and by any rational/material standards would be better off without it.

The problems a real artist faces would seem to be the same in any country: poverty, and the fact that very few people are ever going to understand or appreciate what you
do. It doesn't seem to me that your "30 Day Artist" project deals with any real issues.

"JMO!"


i think this is BS and that this definition for a "real artist" (first off, wtf) is some arbitrary standard set by romaniticizing and flat out lying about some exclusionary ideal set in a place that's intolerant of the mundane. it refuses what it does not love and interprets the ordinary into something special for it's own sake. in short, that mentality has a detatched ignorance that considers itself above the status quo because it proclaimed itself "enlightened"

truth is, no one is above anything.

the notion that one can be a dilletante while another person talks about the utter openess of "real art" pretty much makes any definitive statements like the one quoted completly useless.
but since saying "all levels of creation is art" is solipsistic, theoretical, and disrespects those that have done a lot for their work, my way of looking at "real art", such as it is, only exists in its ability to communicate why it exists. if the artist has truly set a deliberate point and is able enough to share his or her perspective so that you can appreciate it adequately, than that is sucessful.

or you can just BS your way through and let the thinking people make it what it isn't. that's kind of rewarding too.

i like your site. it's not my style but as long as you want to put something across you think is dynamic, engaging, and thoughtful, then keep going.
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Carson Collins
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Postby Carson Collins » Sat Aug 05, 2006 9:56 pm

Far be it from me to say who is and is not an artist! I'm not a critic.

However perhaps we can agree that not all humans are
artists, and that some art pieces may be considered
as superior to other such things, (according to one's
taste, at least)? If not, it would seem impossible to
speak about art and artists at all.

If one prefers to simply say that everyone is an
artist, and that all human activity is art, that's
certainly OK, and it's a widely held belief. It just
isn't one that I personally have found particularly
useful. As you will have observed from my earlier
post, I have a quite different set of beliefs.

The percieved fault with this "30 day artist"
paradigm is simply that I don't think a person who
was not previously inclined to make art can be
transformed into "an artist" (whatever that may be)
by being subjected to some sort of art boot camp.

And I wouldn't have bothered to say anything at all
if the original poster hadn't rather pointedly asked for a critique.
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mtv65
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Artist or not? Art or not

Postby mtv65 » Sun Aug 06, 2006 8:07 am

Just because there are so many different views, this is a very intreesting discussion.

Hamlet, by making such a strict divide AND by using "us" real struggling artists, you put yourself among the "chosen few" and the majority of the rest of us you labelled as hobbyists or diletantes. You could not expect NOT to get reactions.

I can feel myself getting more annoyed the more I think about it. First I'd like to say that I like your paintings, the compositions, the simpleness and the topic. (I love the sea myself being born and raised a fisherman's daughter up north on the coast).
I went to your other gallery, and read your biographical stuff etc.
You might have struggled very hard in life, but I for one could not see sign of it anywhere. Your art (at least all I could see in the 5 galleries) is built up the same way, the media, theme and basic composition is the same. I can see no struggle mastering different media, themes, compositions, skills.

You also talk about having moved around from one state to another and from one country to another but always to places with the right coastline where you have spent days sitting on the beach or surfing in between short term jobs.

Well, excuse me, that sounds like living the life as an eternal interrailer or island jumper. And well, that does not sound very much like suffering to me.

A lot of the hobbyists you obviously look down on, may have spent most of their life taking care of and working up to two jobs to support their families; kids, ailing parents etc. They might have loved to live mainly for their art when young but had to choose responsibilities instead. These days through the net and the digital revolution there are opportuneties for anybody, and I for one love the fact that loads of very talented people can develope their art further outside the local "knitting club" these days.
And yes, I do believe a 30 day art boot camp would be considered a gift from above and would result in lots of good art for many LOL if they got released from all other responsibilities for that month so that they too could sit for hours on the beach every day (without having to look out so that the kids don't drown, don't get burnt by the sun, are fed enough ice cream etc LOL)

So, I do not mind the term hobbyists, but I very much mind the way one feels that you look down on this group of art makers and what content you put into the term. I know a lot of talented art or craftsmen and women who never have had the opportunity or the morals to be so obsessed with themselves and their art as your "real starving artists". They have been too busy putting food on the table for their family to become more than hobbyists. So I look at the product and not at the person's life. Lots of good art has something special about it whether one likes it or not, whether the maker is a full time "real artist" or a hobbyist.

Trine
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Life begins at 40, Right? At least my life as an artist did.
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Carson Collins
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Postby Carson Collins » Sun Aug 06, 2006 9:08 am

Readers of this thread will please note that I never
said that I was a "real" artist, nor that any of you
were not.


What I did was to state some of my opinions about
the problems that real artists face, and what some of
the identifying signs of what I like to call real
artists might be. If the shoe fits, wear it...

Lastly, I did not say, nor intend to say, that those
individuals I have labelled "real" artists are superior
to other mortals. In fact, if you'll take the trouble
to read what I said, it rather gives the impression that
being such a "real" artist is an affliction;
that is my belief, and I do not apologize.
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mtv65
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The vast majority of US

Postby mtv65 » Sun Aug 06, 2006 9:39 am

Some would call being an artist a "gift" but the flip side of that coin is that you can't get rid of it, either. It's a compulsion; a "calling" if you prefer more flowery language.

The vast majority of us spend our lives making stuff that no one wants and waiting for something that's never going to happen... Most artists (I'm not talking about
hobbyists or other dilettantes) lead rather sordid lives, and by any rational/material standards would be better off without it.


So am I to believe that the "US" you consider yourself a part of isn't the "real artist"?

And that you do not dived artists into "most artists" the ones that you say live rather sordid lives, and the hobbiists that you group into a larger group: "Dilettantes" in your post???????

Read your post once more, please.

I do not expect you to apologize. You are entitled to your views as I am not entitled to like them because I think they show a kind of generalisations that I have never been comfortable with.

Trine
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Life begins at 40, Right? At least my life as an artist did.

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